MANHATTAN, NYC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MATH TUTORS

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We travel throughout Manhattan, New York City: Battery Park City, Central Midtown, Chelsea, Chinatown, Clinton, East Village, Financial District, Flatiron District, Garment District, Gramercy Park, Greenwich Village, Harlem, Hell’s Kitchen, Hudson Square, Kips Bay, Little Italy, Lower East Side, Midtown, Murray Hill, SOHO, Sutton Place, Theatre District, Times Square, TriBeCa, Turtle Bay, Union Square, Upper East Side, Upper West Side, West Village
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Manhattan neighborhoods we travel to
Battery Park City Central Midtown Chelsea Chinatown Clinton East Village Financial District Flatiron District Garment District Gramercy Park Greenwich Village Harlem Hell’s Kitchen Hudson Square Kips Bay Little Italy Lower East Side Midtown Murray Hill SOHO Sutton Place Theatre District Times Square TriBeCa Turtle Bay Union Square Upper East Side Upper West Side West Village and More!
We also travel to New Jersey, Riverdale and Westchester.
In-home and at-school Manhattan private pay math tutoring for K-5 students.

Students are assessed using several researched-based programs, such as the EasyCBM and Go Math,  Anecdotally, here’s a great way to see if your child is caught up to speed with their mathematics skills (this breaks it down by grade level).

We also use the i-Ready assessment to supplement and to fill in for learning gaps you might need to be addressed to supplement your child’s academics. When you sign up for lessons through Brooklyn Letters, you will have access to the i-Ready Personalized Instruction offering your child engaging online lessons, intuitive instructional reports, and a motivating student dashboard that encourages student involvement, ownership of learning, and a growth mindset. When needed for mathematical instruction, we recommend manipulatives (we will provide you with a list from Amazon) and digital manipulatives.

Here’s an example of an i-Ready assessment you will receive for your child.

math tutors in brooklyn

What is Multisensory Math?

Multisensory math is a three-dimensional sequential way to learn math. Everyone can benefit from multisensory math particularly those who struggle with math.

Orton-Gillingham Approach in a Math Setting

The Orton-Gillingham approach is a multisensory approach to teaching literacy. It involves using auditory, visual, sensory, and kinesthetic elements to help students understand the connection between language and letters or words.

Multisensory math applies the same principles to mathematics instruction. It encourages the use of touch, sight, hearing, and movement–when learning and teaching a new concept. Marilyn Zecher, M.A., CALT, a certified academic language therapist and specialist, speaker, and former classroom and demonstration teacher, expanded and developed this approach further. She applied and combined the Orton-Gillingham Approach with evidence-based practices based on neuro-imaging studies and NCTM and What Works Clearinghouse recommendations.

Zecher emphasizes the language of math, stressing that the language of instruction is crucial during the process of concept formation and developing skills towards application. Multisensory math uses the Concrete, Representational, and Abstract (CRA) instructional sequence and explicit language to help learners grasp math concepts more effectively.

To ensure effective instruction using the multisensory math approach, learners must be taught explicitly, practice skills consistently, and learn new concepts through CRA.

Concrete (Touch) – This aspect of multisensory math refers to touch. Teachers use tangible objects to represent concepts or numbers, such as breaking apart foam shapes (or using other manipulatives) to demonstrate fractions.

Representational (Drawing) – After concrete or tactile demonstration, teachers can then introduce the representational or drawing aspect. This technique encourages a learner to create his or her own visualization of the concept learned. It also aids students to facilitate their own connections and allows them to write down what they are thinking.

Abstract (Symbols) – Once they have fully understood the lesson introduced and built up during Concrete and Representational,  the next stage is the abstract or symbols sequence. Traditionally, teachers introduced math lessons using only abstract concepts (numbers and symbols). And while this has worked for some, other learners find it difficult to grasp math ideas without concrete or visual representation.

Math Concepts that Learners Should Master

According to Zecher, learners must master four conceptual horizons that lay down the foundation for higher levels of math. These are:

  • Pattern Recognition and Subitizing – Being able to identify quantity instantly or subitizing is a key concept in math and is one of its foundations. The best way to see quantity is through patterns. Having the ability to visualize numbers is crucial in developing a strong number sense. It opens the path to operational fluency and understanding number relationships. An example of subitizing would be recognizing dice patterns: One can visually identify the number or quantity without having to count or tap each dot. Likewise, it is also important to recognize number bonds and understand that numbers can be decomposed or broken down (such as 8 into 3 and 5 or 2 and 6).
  • Place Value Using craft sticks is a great way to teach place value using multisensory math techniques. As the number gets larger, learners can see the quantity change and feel a heavier weight. Likewise, it helps learners visualize the difference between a number’s standard (the number’s name = 125) and expanded form (what it is made of = 100 + 20 + 5).
  • Distributive Property – This refers to a learner’s ability to act on larger quantities and understanding that those quantities can be broken apart or decomposed and act on those numbers. To illustrate, consider 15 x 3. Learners must first understand that 15 can be decomposed into 10 and 5. They can then distribute (multiply) 3 and add those quantities to find the product of 15 x 3.
  • What is ONE and all its many names – This refers to the concept that any number written over itself is equivalent to one. Hence, multiplying or dividing by some form of one only changes the composition of the quantity and not the quantity itself.

Getting Started on Multisensory Math Techniques

Multisensory teaching methods were first applied in literacy and reading instruction. But over the years, learning specialists have found that the same multisensory approach can also be effectively used when teaching math. Particularly, when it is applied using the CRA framework.

To get started with multisensory math, it is important to take advantage of skills that a learner has already mastered. From there, new concepts can be introduced using the CRA method. Using manipulatives is integral in multisensory math, but these do not need to be expensive. Some items commonly used are:

  • Craft sticks
  • Beads and string
  • Base ten blocks
  • Interlocking cubes
  • Color tiles
  • Foam stickers
  • Flat marbles
  • Dice/Dominoes (only up to six)

Here are some multisensory techniques for teaching math:

  • Visualizing with manipulatives such as beads, color tiles, or blocks is an excellent technique to teach basic operations like addition and subtraction. By seeing how quantities change, young learners get a better understanding of how math operations work. Visualization also helps children understand amounts and develop number sense.
  • Using cubes or tiles to build shapes lets children have a concrete and physical representation of measurements and properties.
  • Drawing math problems is an excellent way to reinforce hands-on activities as it lets children illustrate their thinking and the concept they learned.
  • Tapping out numbers allows children to “feel” the value of numbers. It helps students better understand and make connections between symbols and actual amounts.
  • Using songs to help memorize math rules and introduce new concepts.
  • Incorporating movement into math through play and games
  • Using bundling sticks or coffee stirrers to teach regrouping and place value. This can also be done using base ten blocks.
  • Using a hundreds chart is an excellent way to teach number relationships to children.
  • Cutting pizza into slices to introduce and teach the concept of fractions. By cutting up a paper or cardboard pizza, you allow children to see what fractions look like as they select slices.

Find more multisensory math information and resources here:

Free, ready-to-use classroom resources for all students

Applying the Orton-Gillingham Approach to Math Lesson Planning

ASDEC Multisensory Math I Course

Math Print and Digital Resources

XtraMath® is an online math fact fluency program and App that helps students develop quick recall and automaticity of their basic math facts. 

Our Manhattan math tutors can help your child with the following:

Number Lines – A number line is the visual representation of numbers such as fractions, integers, and whole numbers. The numbers are laid out evenly on a straight line, which allows students to picture number sequences. Number lines can be used to compare and order numbers as well as to demonstrate techniques for counting, adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing.

Addition – As one of the basic arithmetic operations, addition is defined as combining two or more groups of objects into a single group. In math, addition refers to the sum or total of two or more numbers. Learners must also understand the properties of addition in order to work with numbers more effectively.

Subtraction – Subtraction refers to the mathematical operation where an amount is taken away from the total. Like addition, subtraction possesses properties that are key in mastering the operation. Identity property and inverse operations both apply to subtraction. However, it is neither commutative or associative.

Division – This operation refers to the process of sharing a number into smaller groups or distributing into equal parts. It is the inverse operation of multiplication. The commutative and associative properties of real numbers do not apply to division.

Multiplication In math, multiplication refers to finding the result of two or more numbers by adding the numbers repeatedly. A multiplication sentence contains a multiplicand (the number multiplied by another number), multiplier (the number by which it is multiplied), and the product or result of multiplying. Multiplication possesses the commutative, associative, identity, and distributive properties.

Fractions Fractions are a way of splitting numbers into equal parts. It consists of a numerator, or the number of equal parts counted, and a denominator that represents the total number of equal parts in one whole. Fractions are classified into three types: proper, improper, and mixed fractions.

Decimals – A decimal is a way to write fractions. It consists of a whole number and a fraction of a whole number (any part less than 1) separated by a dot or decimal point. Decimals are expressed in the scale of tens (tenths, hundredths, thousandths, and so on).

MATH TUTORS IN MANHATTAN, NYC

Dr. Tamara

NY State Early Childhood and Students with Disabilities (B-2)

Tamara C.

Tamara is a veteran early childhood educator with over 25 years of experience in the field. She holds an MST and MsEd from Fordham University, an MBA, and an Ed.D from Johns Hopkins University where she researched the impact adults have on children’s social/emotional development.

Tamara taught kindergarten for over 10 years, with experience in Pre-K, and first grade. She has also worked one-on-one with students from 2 to 20 years old in all areas of literacy acquisition, including phonics, phonemic awareness, writing, fluency and comprehension. She has been trained in Wilson, Fundations, Fountas and Pinnell, the Teacher’s College Reading and Writing Project, Reading Rescue and Reading Recovery and is currently the Associate Director of Professional Learning for Reading Rescue.

Tamara’s methods of instruction focus on the reading science through a multisensory approach to instruction, as well as on the fun. She prides herself on students LOVING her sessions. She works with students on not only their literacy skills, but also focusing on their self-esteem and comfort level so they are prepared to take their learning back to their classrooms.  She has experience working with students with various needs including ADHD, autism, anxiety, behavior disorders, and dyslexia.

Tamara has experience working with pre-K through fifth-grade math curricula. She supports students in developing all aspects of mathematics using a multi-sensory approach. Students use real-world situations and manipulatives to not only learn the HOW of math concepts, but also the WHY. Tamara has experience working with Everyday Math, Go Math, Singapore Math, and state test prep.

Tamara has experience working with pre-K through fifth-grade math curricula. She supports students in developing all aspects of mathematics using a multi-sensory approach. Students use real-world situations and manipulatives to not only learn the HOW of math concepts, but also the WHY. Tamara has experience working with Everyday Math, Go Math, Singapore Math, and state test prep.

In addition to literacy support, Tamara provides test prep, executive functioning skills coaching, as well as study skills.

LOCATION: Brooklyn: Downtown Brooklyn, Sunset Park, Bensonhurst, Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights; Manhattan: Upper West Side, Midtown West, Chelsea, The Village, Financial District;  Staten Island; Bronx; New Jersey: Bergen and Hudson counties

TYPE OF SERVICES: Individualized reading instruction, test prep, executive functioning, study skills, parent consultation and coaching

EXPERTISE: Early childhood education, special education, early literacy acquisition, social/emotional development

AGES: birth through elementary school

REBECCA M.

M.S. . ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, CERTIFIED ELEMENTARY TEACHER (Grades 1-6 )
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Rebecca is an elementary education teacher (grades 1-6) in the New York City Department of Education. She currently teaches 1st grade in Brooklyn. She received her Bachelors in Economics from Northeastern University and her Masters of Science in Elementary Education with an endorsement in Middle School Social Studies from Northwestern University.

Rebecca has experience working with first through third grade math curricula. She supports students in developing number sense, problem solving skills, and varied approaches to problems. She specializes in helping students gain a deeper understanding of the math curriculum through the use of concrete models and manipulatives. Rebecca has experience working with Go Math, TERC, and implementing Metamorphosis Math strategies.

TATIANA S.

M.S. . Elementary Education, Certificate in Childhood Education (grades 1-6)
Tatiana Spragins

Tatiana is a certified teacher with a track record of success on the NY state exams and over 7 years of experience in NYC schools. She graduated with honors from the University of Notre Dame and is a Teach for America alumna. During her time as a TFA corps member, she completed a Masters in Elementary Education from the Relay Graduate School of Education and holds a Professional Certificate in Childhood Education (grades 1-6).

Tatiana specializes in inquiry-based learning and constructivist teaching methods. She implements Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic, and Tactile (VAKT) strategies in her lesson plans. She uses a Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) approach to teaching math that is rigorous and individualized to each student. Tatiana will incorporate various multi-sensory techniques, including the use of manipulatives, to develop conceptual understanding. She firmly believes that successful math instruction happens when teachers build on students innate number sense and curiosity, making math fun and accessible to all learners.

She recently accepted a role as an educational consultant, coaching teachers and leaders on using data to drive instruction and best practices for effective differentiation. Prior to this, she taught 3rd-5th grade on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, then in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn.

Tatiana has extensive experience with test prep material and is deeply familiar with the Common Core State Standards for Math. She achieved a 100% pass-rate on the NY State Math Test for three consecutive years, exceeding the statewide average by 60%.

Location: Downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn (preference for Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Prospect Heights, Boerum Hill, Park Slope, Downtown Brooklyn, Brooklyn Heights, Dumbo, Carroll Gardens and Cobble Hill)

Types of Services: Individualized reading and math instruction and remediation, building and strengthening knowledge of math concepts (grades 3-6), developing study skills, support with homework, test prep for ELA and math exams

Expertise: Math instruction for grades 3-6, constructivist teaching practices, test prep for math and ELA

Ages: 3rd through 6th grade

PETER W.

SPECIAL EDUCATOR AND CHILDHOOD LITERACY SPECIALIST, PRE-K 4th GRADE, MS, PhD
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Peter teaches K-4 math using a constructivist approach rooted in language and conceptualization to achieve number sense. He uses a variety of hands-on methods with visual aids and manipulatives to master the operations. Grades K-4, no test-prep.

Dan B.

M.S. ED., NYS CERTIFIED CHILDHOOD GENERAL AND SPECIAL EDUCATION (GRADES 1-6)

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Dan has a passion for teaching math and uses kinesthetic/tactile strategies to reach all learners. Dan takes a game like approach with the aim of eliminating any fear or anxiety that a student may experience. Dan brings a wealth of experience to teaching math and is able to seamlessly assess, plan and differentiate engaging instruction for all learners. He has used Go-Math, NY Engage, Everyday Math from the University of Chicago and TERC Investigations. Dan has taught math in grades k-8 and, in addition to teaching new concepts, is able to prepare students for standardized tests.

Amy H.

New York State Certified Literacy Instructor, M.S.ed, Wilson Trained

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Amy earned her Masters of Education at Bank Street College of Education. She is experienced with students who have a broad array of learning issues including Dyslexia, and works one-to-one with students in decoding, fluency, reading comprehension, spelling, phonological awareness and language delays. She also works with general education students needing extra support.

Amy has extensive experience with supporting pre-literacy skills such as letter identification, phonics, kindergarten readiness, and performs formal and informal assessments. She is trained in multiple Orton Gillingham programs including Wilson, Fundations, PAF, and IMSE. In addition to her work with these structured, multi-sensory approaches, she has extensive experience with teaching comprehension skills and filling in gaps for students needing support with specific concepts. She is experienced in Seeing Stars and Lindamood Bell methods used frequently for students needing greater language support.

Amy has a warm, intuitive nature and specializes in individualizing her plan of action for each student. She has experience teaching within Manhattan s private k-3 schools as a reading teacher and learning specialist and has tutored students through middle school. She has worked with students ranging in age from 3-14.

LOCATION: Manhattan, including Harlem

TYPES OF SERVICES: Orton Gillingham individualized lessons, reading comprehension, formal and informal reading assessments, phonological awareness, sound-symbol association, decoding strategies, fluency, and reading comprehension, spelling, sight word recognition, pre-literacy, and kindergarten readiness.

EXPERTISE: Developing individualized remediation for struggling readers

AGES: Pre-school through middle school

Betsy S.

M.S. Education

Betsy S.

Betsy is a second-grade teacher at a private school in the Upper West Side. She received her Master’s Degree in General Education from Hunter College for first through sixth grades. Betsy has a passion for teaching math and reading to first through third-graders, including those who are advanced and those who struggle to learn these fundamental skills.

Betsy teaches through an inquiry-based curriculum and loves to see her students take ownership of their math and literacy learning. She uses a variety of strategies through personalized instruction to meet the needs of her students. She believes in a game-based, hands-on, multi-sensory approach to mastering mathematical concepts. One of her areas of expertise is helping students learn a number sense, building strategies to solve math word problems, and understand maths concepts (connecting abstract to concrete). She is also trained in Everyday Math, Exemplars, Mathletics, and Matific. 

Betsy is also passionate about reading and believes in the importance of building students’ confidence at the elementary level. She has experience in the Teachers College Reading Workshop and Fountas and Pinnel reading programs. She loves to find ways to spark reading in young children and scaffold and develop reading strategies to support them as they acquire underlying literacy skills. In a favorite curriculum at her school, Betsy aligns her reading and writing units through transdisciplinary themes.

Location: Manhattan (Upper East Side, Midtown East/West, Upper West Side, Chelsea)
Type of Services: Initial reading and math assessments, individualized reading, phonemic awareness, phonics, spelling and math intervention, and instruction.
Expertise: Homework help, spelling difficulties, reading comprehension, expository and narrative writing instruction
Ages: First-Third grade